How It Works
Garden Bridge

Garden Bridge: A greener commute across London’s River Thames

Garden Bridge

Among the towering skyscrapers and bustling streets of England’s capital city, a new leafy green oasis is due to be constructed.

The Garden Bridge will give pedestrians a more scenic route across London’s River Thames, with a footpath that weaves through an expansive garden landscape.

Garden Bridge
The Garden Bridge will provide year-round colour and attract a diverse range of wildlife

Around 2,500 square metres (26,910 square feet) of the bridge will feature 270 trees, 2,000 shrubs, hedging plants and climbers, over 22,000 hardy perennials, ferns and grasses and 64,000 bulbs. Each species has been selected specifically for its resilience and suitability for this environment, and soil scientists have ensured the right conditions for different species can be achieved.

At the time of writing, the project is still waiting final approval, but it’s hoped construction will begin in 2016 and it will open to the public in 2018, providing a leafy link between north and south London.

Super-strength protective skin

Garden Bridge
The base of the Garden Bridge will have a protective copper-nickel alloy skin

The carbon steel feet and underside of the Garden Bridge will be coated in copper- nickel alloy, a material also known as cupronickel that is made mainly of copper, a smaller percentage of nickel and some iron and manganese.

It is typically used to coat boats and oil rigs because of its excellent resistance to seawater corrosion, so will help to prevent the bridge from rusting. It will also help to improve the strength of the bridge and make for a visually appealing structure thanks to its warm colour.

More than 240 tons of cupronickel will be required to cover the 366-metre (1,201-foot) walkway, but its protective qualities will make the bridge very low maintenance.

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Plus take a look at:

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  • Joseph Ogden

    I invite anyone who thinks this bridge is an asset to go down to the landing point on the South
    Bank, as I have done, and imagine the effect of dropping such a huge structure on such a small space, to then add in the crowds of tourists milling around while waiting to be let on, to picture the grim faces of the security guards tasked with stopping prams, bicycles, picnickers, large groups of children and other categories of ordinary people trying to use it, to see the angry groups of commuters who were told it would be a pleasant way to get to work and are returning to the quicker, calmer route over Waterloo Bridge where they will see the oppressive hugeness of the structure hiding the open broad sweep of the river.

    To call it “a leafy green oasis” is akin to congratulating the emperor on his new clothes.